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Home Forums Music Forum Safe ways to belt people? (All Teachers)

  • Eliza Fyfe

    Member
    August 10, 2015 at 5:28 pm

    A comma would definitely save lives here.

  • Ben Reeves

    Member
    August 10, 2015 at 5:28 pm

    Wear gloves, could injure yourself otherwise

  • Matt Pocock

    Member
    August 10, 2015 at 5:29 pm

    Don’t use the metal end.

  • Guest Teacher

    Member
    August 10, 2015 at 5:29 pm

    Lol. In answer to your question, I teach belt by getting people to tap into the sound of calling out (I believe it’s anatomically nearly identical in terms of the coordination of everything – unless Matt disagrees with me…). I’ll start with a really low and comfortable “hey”, which we then build up in volume and pitch till we’re really calling out. The key thing is to make sure that the vocal fold closure is nice and consistent throughout, no unintentional growling. Then I formalise the pitch into an 8 note scale alternating between “hey” and “ha”. Then if we’re applying belt to a particular song, I get them to call out the song lyrics on pitch then get them to make the jump to making the sound more “musical”. I often use elements of Alexander Technique to help release any unnecessary neck tension. Hope that helps.

  • Eliza Fyfe

    Member
    August 10, 2015 at 5:30 pm

    Yes it does! Thanks. I imagine making the sound more nasal helps as well?

  • Guest Teacher

    Member
    August 10, 2015 at 5:30 pm

    Yea that twangy sound in particular.

  • Eliza Fyfe

    Member
    August 10, 2015 at 5:30 pm

    I LIKE it.

  • Guest Teacher

    Member
    August 10, 2015 at 5:30 pm

    Another great trick is to stick the tongue out as far as possible. It’ll encourage a nice open throat if the pupil tends to have a lot of constriction.

  • Matt Pocock

    Member
    August 10, 2015 at 5:31 pm

    Oooh, one of my favourite topics. Chris is definitely right in recommending that there be no grit/distortion/breathiness in a belted sound. The twang is a crucial component, although I wouldn’t recommend nasality for belting. It gets the student to over-associate belting with nasality, which will lead to confusion in the long run.

    I’m a big fan of using a good deal of thyroid tilt in a belt to make it safer. It thins the folds, demanding less power while also increasing note accuracy. It’s a kind of magically easy way of making notes easier – a proper Yoda move.

    And it can still sound crazy awesome.

  • Matt Pocock

    Member
    August 10, 2015 at 5:31 pm

    (For those unanointed by the holy water of Estill, the thyroid tilt can be engaged by cry-y, whiny, sobby qualities. Check out Gillyanne Kayes’ book Voice and the Actor for a great explanation.)

  • Eliza Fyfe

    Member
    August 10, 2015 at 5:31 pm

    I always just call it the gorilla sound, or try and sound like a bloke yet staying high (for the girls!) that’s cool as I’m doing a lot of what’s being mentioned already..!

  • Matt Pocock

    Member
    August 10, 2015 at 5:31 pm

    Nice!🙂 Though I would definitely recommend finesse over force when it comes to belting.

  • Eliza Fyfe

    Member
    August 10, 2015 at 5:32 pm

    Yeah sometimes I can’t get the balance right as they push a little too hard. I mostly just try to demonstrate the gorilla (thyroid tilt in posh language?!) in the way that it can be effortless although well projected without just shouting

  • Eliza Fyfe

    Member
    August 10, 2015 at 5:32 pm

    My student who needed assistance with the above wants to thank Chris for the tongue sticking out idea as she immediately noticed that it helped. We are currently doing sobby singing too which is proving to be very effective!

  • Guest Teacher

    Member
    August 10, 2015 at 5:32 pm

    Yay! And I love sobby singing.

  • Veronica Wakeling

    Member
    September 24, 2021 at 2:12 pm

    Belting can easily turn into shouting.The student must be technically correct in all dynamics of singing and able to use open throat technique with a dropped larynx….for safety.Much the same as a dramatic tenor uses the voice for power,.Breathing technique from the core is essential.Hope this helps.

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