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  • Message from a student (Singing Teachers)

    Posted by Eliza Fyfe on June 8, 2015 at 5:25 pm

    More problems… I’m just not a doctor!!!
    Message from student:
    “Just emailing to ask for some advice as I have got laryngitis again…. I got it around this time last year. I did a gig on Saturday and my voice didnt feel fabulous and then i stupidly went busking afterwards. I woke up the next day with barely any speaking voice. im now trying to be on complete vocal rest and not speak to anyone (v hard) but what else can i do???? And how can I avoid getting it in the future? I try to drink water and do warm ups but i still got it… I guess it didnt help i went to lounge 2 nights before 🙁
    also, i spoke to a guy the other day that had just had surgery for vocal nodules and now im really freaked out”
    I just have no advice!!!

    Matt Pocock replied 9 years ago 2 Members · 4 Replies
  • 4 Replies
  • Guest Teacher

    Member
    June 8, 2015 at 5:31 pm

    I’d start by encouraging them that if they haven’t had laryngitis for a year, then they must be doing something right. If not, it would be happening all the time. For the moment, rest up and soothe the throat as much as possible. It’s inflamed so it needs time to get back to normal. Keep developing a good full vocal fold closure during lessons. That’s ultimately the thing that will stop this from becoming a persistent problem. I try to encourage any of my students that work with a breathy/raspy/distorted sound to listen to other performers who use that sound live. Live performers really have to understand how manage that kind of pressure on the voice. It might be as simple as having a bit of a cough and talk to the audience between songs to calm down a bit, or some songs may require a 5 minute break to recover from. It comes down to understanding what the body is trying to tell you. One of my favourites for this is James Hatfield from Metallica. He really understands that although he can scream his head off in the studio, he won’t be able to regularly performing with that sound so he changes the sound to something more sustainable. Finally, this is something that happens to the best of us. I had a problem just the other week. I was acting in a venue where the sound just went up, not out to the audience. Rather than trusting myself to project the sound out, I was basically yelling my lines and went hoarse the next morning. It happens, we recover, and if we don’t act stupid and try and keep demanding more from a damaged voice then we won’t get the horrible nodules, etc. Hope this long ramble helps!

  • Eliza Fyfe

    Member
    June 8, 2015 at 5:31 pm

    Thanks Chris, I’ll pass that on! Unfortunately she’s not actually having lessons with me at the moment

  • Guest Teacher

    Member
    June 8, 2015 at 5:32 pm

    eek! hopefully that changes soon for her sake

  • Matt Pocock

    Member
    June 8, 2015 at 5:32 pm

    Chris nailed it 🙂

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